University of Utah

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S.J. Quinney College of Law

Location
Salt Lake City, Utah

Size
155,000 gsf, 14,400 m2

Services
Architecture, Interior Architecture

Sustainable Programs
LEED for New Construction & Major Renovations (NC) LEED-NC-Platinum

Awards
Award of Excellence - Institutional Architecture, Design Awards, Educational Facility Design Award - Award of Merit

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This new, sustainable home for the S.J. Quinney College of Law is the embodiment of the exceptional and innovative education that will be offered within its walls. It will facilitate additional programs while providing an impressive gateway to the campus.

—David W. Pershing, President, University of Utah

Description

A top-tier law school known for its strong tradition of community service, the University of Utah’s College of Law needed to update its aging facilities. The university identified a prominent site at the southwestern corner of campus, and set high expectations for its long-awaited new law building. SmithGroupJJR, in association with Salt Lake City-based VCBO Architects, designed a student-centric environment that would inspire collaboration between students and faculty as well as facilitate community-engaged applied learning.

Rather than the more typical law school layout that compartmentalizes functions, the S.J. Quinney College of Law provides a variety of settings for collaborative study and research. The new facility boasts advanced instructional facilities including a variety of classrooms, skills development spaces, and a large auditorium and events room that opens to a rooftop terrace. Additionally, the design creates a much-needed, accessible campus path via a series of gardens and ramps.

Conservation of resources and a desire to inspire responsible practices were among top goals for this LEED Platinum certified project. Energy-efficient features incorporated in the design include solar generators that also function as shading devices, a system that utilizes site well-water for building cooling, and a chilled-beam system that is expected to cut heating and cooling costs in half.